Sustainable Solar Homes | Property Management | Repair/Remodel | Finish Carpentry & Tile | Home Inspections

Click on galleries below to see recent projects completed by Sunwood Design & Building.

Dixon Hacienda A complete renovation of a 400 year-old adobe hacienda that was part of the original Spanish settlement in Dixon, NM. 

Dixon Hacienda

A complete renovation of a 400 year-old adobe hacienda that was part of the original Spanish settlement in Dixon, NM. 

Pueblo-Style Two-Story Adobe This home uses RASTRA wall materials and many other unique features are incorporated in the construction. Designed by  Sunwood Design.

Pueblo-Style Two-Story Adobe

This home uses RASTRA wall materials and many other unique features are incorporated in the construction. Designed by  Sunwood Design.

Mountain Sanctuary This home is powered completely by solar energy. The "living roof" is covered with soil and plants to promote energy efficiency. Designed by Archetype Design.

Mountain Sanctuary

This home is powered completely by solar energy. The "living roof" is covered with soil and plants to promote energy efficiency. Designed by Archetype Design.

Southwestern Dream Farmhouse This post-and-beam with strawbale home comes with custom pine spiral staircase, stained concrete floors, stone window and door sills, nichos, talavera tile, smooth interior plaster, and much more.

Southwestern Dream Farmhouse

This post-and-beam with strawbale home comes with custom pine spiral staircase, stained concrete floors, stone window and door sills, nichos, talavera tile, smooth interior plaster, and much more.

Passive-Solar In passive solar building design, windows, walls, and floors are made to collect, store, and distribute solar energy in the form of heat in the winter and reject solar heat in the summer. This is called passive solar design or climatic design because, unlike active solar heating systems, it doesn't involve the use of mechanical and electrical devices. The key to designing a passive solar building is to best take advantage of the local climate. Elements to be considered include window placement and glazing type, thermal insulation, thermal mass, and shading. Passive solar design techniques can be applied most easily to new buildings, but existing buildings can be adapted or "retrofitted".

Passive-Solar

In passive solar building design, windows, walls, and floors are made to collect, store, and distribute solar energy in the form of heat in the winter and reject solar heat in the summer. This is called passive solar design or climatic design because, unlike active solar heating systems, it doesn't involve the use of mechanical and electrical devices.

The key to designing a passive solar building is to best take advantage of the local climate. Elements to be considered include window placement and glazing type, thermal insulationthermal mass, and shading. Passive solar design techniques can be applied most easily to new buildings, but existing buildings can be adapted or "retrofitted".

Lama Foundation Community Center In 1997, after the disastrous fire in the Lama area, this community building miraculously survived but was in need of repair.  The large solar roof provides heat which is ducted to the rest of the building, and both active and passive solar features power the self-sufficient structure. A small solar shed keeps the inverters and other equipment warm, with some of the PV panels mounted on the shed roof.  Plumbing/ mechanical by Phoenix Mechanical, concrete by Medina Specialties, concrete counters by Cassim Dunn, plaster by Malcolm Boyd, kitchen table by Kailash, cabinets by Jonathan Scharfman, with lots of other parts of the whole contributed by Lama volunteers. Sunwood is happy to have been part of the effort to finish this facility for the Lama Foundation community.

Lama Foundation Community Center

In 1997, after the disastrous fire in the Lama area, this community building miraculously survived but was in need of repair. 

The large solar roof provides heat which is ducted to the rest of the building, and both active and passive solar features power the self-sufficient structure. A small solar shed keeps the inverters and other equipment warm, with some of the PV panels mounted on the shed roof. 

Plumbing/ mechanical by Phoenix Mechanical, concrete by Medina Specialties, concrete counters by Cassim Dunn, plaster by Malcolm Boyd, kitchen table by Kailash, cabinets by Jonathan Scharfman, with lots of other parts of the whole contributed by Lama volunteers.

Sunwood is happy to have been part of the effort to finish this facility for the Lama Foundation community.